Cream Of Broccoli Soup

I thought I’d posted this here years ago, but it turns out I gave it to a different site.  Anyway, this is a super easy recipe that takes about an hour and a half to make and is really easy to customize to suit your personal taste.  If you don’t like as much garlic as I do, cut it by half (or altogether…freak).  If you’re less concerned about protein than I am, get rid of the edamame.  Play with it however you want.  You’ll need:

2 lbs. Broccoli
2 Med. Onions
1 Celery Stalk
1 Cup Edamame
1 Bulb Garlic
1 Tablespoon Mustard
1 Tablespoon Extra Virgin Olive Oil
8-10 Cups Chicken Broth
4-5 Cups Water
0.5 Cups Fat Free Greek Yogurt
Juice Of One Lemon

Peel and cut the onions and garlic and throw them into your stockpot.  Likewise with the celery.  Next, cut your broccoli heads into florets and chop the stems into bite sized pieces and throw all of that into your stockpot as well.  Add one tablespoon of your favorite mustard and another tablespoon of extra virgin olive oil into the pot along with a few pinches of salt (not too much, you’ll be seasoning to taste at the end) and black pepper.

Next, add the water and the chicken broth.  Exactly how much to add of each can vary, but the important part is to keep it at roughly two parts broth to one part water.  Also, if you’re using store-bought broth, try and get the low sodium kind so as not to over-season the soup.  Set your stove burner to high and let it all come to a boil.  Once your soup is boiling, turn the heat down to low and let it simmer for approximately 30-45 minutes.

Using either a wand blender or a traditional blender (do this in small batches if using a traditional blender…unless you’re fond of scalding-hot burns, in which case just mash it all together with your hands), blend your soup into a puree.  Once this is done, add the juice of one lemon and a half cup of Greek yogurt and whisk until the soup takes on a creamy appearance.  Season to taste and you’re done.

If you like thicker soups, turn the heat back up to medium high and let it simmer, checking on it every ten minutes or so until you’re happy with it.

About

Tim Hatch lives in a secret volcano headquarters somewhere in the South Pacific, where he controls the world economy and writes confessional poetry about his disappointing childhood.

His poetry has been published in MungBeing, East Jasmine Review, The Pacific Review, The Vehicle, Touch: The Journal Of Healing, Apeiron Review, and he is the recipient of the 2014 Felix Valdez Award.

He finds writing about himself in the third person to be an overtly seductive invitation to tell lies.

He once captured a French Eagle at Talavera.

Posted in Recipes